Skip to content

Believe Mothers!

I will never forget the many times I was comforted by someone when I just needed them to believe me regarding my concerns about Jack. It’s time to start seeing mothers as strong women, not just sensitive women. As soon as a woman becomes a mother, it seems she will no longer be taken seriously regarding her child. She will be considered emotional and therefore not to be trusted. In my experience, especially with Jack, people seem to try and “fix” mothers who are showing concern for their children instead of actually listening and believing them. The stigma of the overly emotional and therefore untrustworthy mother has been such a difficult one to break apart on my journey with Jack. The only thing that broke this stigma was me being right about Jack so many times that doctors had to start trusting me. The heightened emotions and overt awareness of mothers make us even more observant and reliable. 

Yet, mothers carry around a stigma of implied emotional imbalance. This way of thinking is incredibly damaging and truthfully dangerous because it leads everyone, especially doctors, to dismiss a mother’s legitimate concerns.  I can speak from my own raw experience on this topic because I watched my newborn son have seizures for almost 24-hours and I couldn’t get anyone to take me seriously. Thus, I doubted myself and didn’t seek the help he needed until it was too late and a brain injury occurred, leaving us with a lifetime of “what if”. What if ANYONE had chosen to listen to me, to believe me.

My son, Jack, was born full term via my second vaginal delivery. We were discharged on time and excited to join Jack’s big sister at home. However, after just one day at home, I noticed that Jack was having some strange facial expressions, eye movements, and twitching in his extremities. It became more concerning when he started crying, and I mean screaming and crying like he was hurting, and then stopped eating. The crying episode lasted roughly 15 hours (no joke!), but when I raised concerns with Jack’s pediatrician about feeling like something just wasn’t right, I was dismissed and told that he was just colicky or experiencing reflux.

We went in to ped’s office and I will never forget how the nurse, my family’s nurse, took Jack out of my arms and said, “what’s wrong with you? Don’t you remember how to hold and soothe a baby?” I know she was joking and she was pretty to quick to hand the screaming/twitching Jack back to me, but that preyed on my worst insecurities: that I was making a big deal out of nothing and that I was the problem. It was not just Jack’s pediatrician who dismissed my concerns and tried to give me a hug instead. My own mother tried to soothe my fears instead of encouraging action when it seemed something wasn’t right with Jack. I took Jack to my mom and she insisted that he just needed a bath. She kept trying to soothe me and I kept feeling like I was insane because I saw that something serious was going on with son. I was so scared, but at that point, my son’s pediatrician, my mom, and my husband had all dismissed my concerns. If only someone would have chosen to believe me.  

Just as I feared, my son has been experiencing life-threatening seizure activity due to a rare genetic disorder that was discovered much later. I waited to long to seek help at a more acute level and he ended up in status epilepticus, requiring critical and life-saving care from a pediatric life-flight team and PICU team.  (Status epilepticus is a medical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. SE is defined as a continuous seizure lasting more than 30 min, or two or more seizures without full recovery of consciousness between any of them.) My son’s disorder wasn’t caught in time to prevent brain damage, but I will always wonder “what if” I had just believed in myself more.

While so much of our early experiences with Jack’s rare disease are absolutely horrific, I am so grateful that his condition was caught through genetic testing and he has a really great quality of life now. However, we almost lost him. There were many in opportunities during Jack’s newborn stage for his rare disease to be caught, yet it was missed time and time again. Jack’s brain was beginning to atrophy, seizures were growing worse, and yet I would still be begging my loved ones and my son’s doctor to believe me I said something wasn’t right with my son. The people around me weren’t even looking at the baby in my arms, but instead trying to comfort and soothe me because they assumed I was just being oversensitive. While I was often appalled by the responses I was receiving, they still allowed doubt to creep in and take root enough to prevent me from taking immediate action to help my son in many instances. These are people that I love and trust, people who love and respect me, but the oversensitive mother is such a well-established stigma that even my loved ones couldn’t see past it at times. I know there are so many moms who can relate and who have been silenced, dismissed, and even shamed when they attempted to advocate for their child. This is why we must believe mothers!!

My own mom will say to this day that she wishes she would have never wasted the time trying to soothe me and convince me that Jack was okay because he truly was not and even she could tell something was wrong at the time. She will admit to not wanting to upset me and that’s why she tried to quell all my worst fears. I think many people would have done the same. Not wanting to jump on the oversensitive bandwagon, my mom tried to fix the situation the way she had been taught. I say we replace soothing new mothers to advocating for them and beside them. How do you do this? You just have to listen to them and believe them. This is post is the beginning of my Newborn Screening Saves Lives series. What if more doctors encouraged mothers to be an active part of newborn screening? That would have made all the difference for my family. One heel prick and a few minutes examining a newborn isn’t adequate for newborn screening. Report what you see, take videos, and never EVER let anyone make you feel ashamed for advocating for you child. If you feel like something is wrong with your newborn and you’re not being taken seriously, take your kiddo to the nearest children’s hospital ER and have no shame!

Newborn Screening legislation is something that I am so excited to share about/advocate for–please contact me if you have any questions and stay tuned for more to come! 

Believe Mothers.PNG–>This photo was taken after Jack was (mis)diagnosed with Mitochondrial Disease and we were told he wouldn’t live much longer. He was discharged on palliative care and my dear friend did a little family photo shoot for us. I though it would be the only one we would ever have. NEWBORN SCREENING SHOULD CHANGE AND SAVE LIVES. This should have never happened and I work for the rest of my life to prevent such heartache and confusion from happening to another family!

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: